Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - Cary Austin

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 15
1
Reviews / Happy Camper even though Driller went Negative
« on: January 11, 2019, 08:20:47 AM »
I have a new home with a new irrigations system. The Irrigation system has 13 zone with 6 heads on each zone at a total of 18 gpm. I have a close friend that is in the irrigation business that told me that when I had a well drilled to have them install a Cycle Stop Valve.


When I contracted with a well driller for a new well and I asked him about the Cycle Stop Valve he immediately went negative. So I just dropped it. We drilled to 410' and installed a 3hp pump putting out about 30gpm.

After the well was installed and the irrigation system was on, the pump
would cycle on and off about every 4 or 5 minutes. This would go on for 4½ hours every morning. Common sense told me this was going to cause premature failure of the submersible pump.


So against my drillers advise, I installed the CSV125-3. Now the pump comes on at 40psi, pumps up to 50psi and stays there the entire time that the irrigation system is running. Once the irrigation system turns off, the pressure goes to 60psi and the pump shuts off.


*Everything works just like your website said it would. *


*I am a very happy camper.*


Thanks

Warren Ducote

Montgomery, Texas

2
Frequently Asked Questions / NSF certification
« on: August 16, 2018, 01:42:53 PM »
Like most other things in California, it is a political decision, not a rational one.  You could grind an entire CSV into powder and dissolve it into the amount of water it would pass over it's lifetime, and I would let my grand kids drink it all day long everyday of their lives.  In reality there might be a teaspoon worth of material wash off that valve over it's life span.  That prop 65 thing the Californians started is costing the entire world billions of dollars.  They actually have to grind up small parts from our valves into powder and dissolve it in acid to see what the components are made of.  None of that material comes off the valve and gets into the water under normal use.

The CSV3B is NSF372, which means no lead.  But they won't give us the NSF61G because the rubber diaphragm has some Sulfur in it.  Again, lead, Sulfur, or anything else the valve is made of does not get ground down and dissolved into the water under any condition.

Our grand parents lived to be 90-100 years old drinking water from pure leaded brass pumps, and even solid lead pipes like in Flint Michigan.  Lead is an important part of many metals, and they are inferior without the lead in them.  Even the solid lead pipe in Flint was never a problem for 100 years until some government employee decided to change the water supply to an acidic source.  The acidic water dissolved the patina on the lead pipes, and it was actually the lead oxidized patina that caused the problems, not the lead pipes.  The only thing those NSF certifications did was to make the company NSF rich, and to reduce the quality and increase the price of everything the American pubic purchases.

3
Frequently Asked Questions / Another VFD is best argument
« on: March 03, 2018, 10:56:30 AM »
Hey Cary, I'm a new guy to the forum and am going to be installing a well pump on my property in the next month or so and have taken an interest in your CSV's. I've been trying to comb through the forums and website to try and get as much details on it as I could but decided to just ask you about it personally. I only have a couple local pump guys that I could have install my pump for me, and both of them pushed pretty hard about installing a VFD. The problem is their quotes were a lot steeper than I wanted to pay and discovered they had the VFD's at MSRP price after I found the same ones on my own online for $600-$700 cheaper. So they pissed me off and needless to say I've decided I'm going to just install the pump myself. I work in the power generation industry and discussed installing a CSV instead of going with a VFD with some mechanics I work with because i'm trying to save money, and don't have a good knack for electrical work. After discussing it with them they are under the impression that a CSV will be hard on the pump from excessive back pressure, whether it is blowing seals or ruining the bearings. I have a general understanding of how pumps work and that if you stay within the manufacturers pump curve then you shouldn't be damaging a pump, so I guess my question is could you explain to me why the CSV isn't hard on the pump even though it is throttling the discharge of the pump whenever there is a low flow demand? This is both for my own knowledge and to have some ammunition on why my co workers shouldn't have wasted their money on VFD's. Thanks for any info.


Hello
You are exactly right!  They are MADE to pump against a restriction.  If there was no restriction, you wouldn't need a pump to start with.  I will attach a pump curve you can print out to show them.  A curve shows what a pump is designed to do at different amounts of "restriction".  Any pump will produce less GPM in a deep well (more restriction) and more GPM in a shallower well (less restriction). 

The attached curve shows a 2HP pump at 28 GPM, with a 1.2 service factor it is pulling a 2.3HP load with only 200' (86 PSI) restriction.  But when you restrict it further to 320' of head (138 PSI) it is only pumping 2 GPM and only drawing 0.8HP load.  That is just the way pumps work.  There is a BIG myth-understanding about this.  Everybody thinks restricting a pump makes it work harder, when just the opposite is true. 

That pump producing 28 GPM thinks it is in a 200' deep well and draws up to the maximum service factor load, which is 13.8 amps.  But when you restrict it more and make it think it is in a 320' deep well, it can only produce 2 GPM and only drawing 0.8HP load, which is about 5 amps.  The maximum amps or heat that motor can handle is 13.8 amps, so when it is only drawing 5.0 amps, it is just loping along, running cooler, needed less flow for cooling, and will ultimately last longer because of it.  Not to mention that the restriction from the CSV is what keeps the pump from producing more water than is being used, which is how it eliminates the cycling. 

Running cooler at reduced amps and eliminating the cycling will make this pump last several times MORE than it was designed to do, not shorten its life in anyway.

The only restriction that will hurt a pump is one that make the water heat up.  And since the CSV can never completely close, that cannot happen.  As a matter of fact the minimum flow built into the CSV (1 GPM) is designed to be several times more than the pump actually needs to stay cool anyway.  It just takes very little cool water to keep a motor/pump happy when it is only drawing 40-50% of max amps and not actually producing any heat.

I was doing VFD's 30+ years ago when I figured this out.  A VFD is just trying to trick a pump into doing something it already does naturally.

Hope this helps.

Thanks
Cary

4
Reviews / 8 Years with No Problems
« on: August 09, 2017, 10:19:27 AM »
8 years in service with no problems.  Two 3HP, one 5HP centrifugal pumps.   One 10HP submersible with 3” Cycle Stop Valve, and one 5HP with 2” Cycle Stop Valve.  5 Cycle Stop Valves total on this system.  Can’t imagine how much it would cost to try and keep VFD’s working on a system like this. 
Gary Kirkham

5
Reviews / Against the Well Drillers Advice
« on: July 05, 2017, 02:45:07 PM »
I have a new home with a new irrigations system. The Irrigation system has 13 zone with 6 heads on each zone at a total of 18 gpm. I have a close friend that is in the irrigation business that told me that when I had a well drilled to have them install a Cycle Stop Valve.

When I contracted with a well driller for a new well and I asked him about the Cycle Stop Valve he immediately went negative. So I just dropped it. We drilled to 410' and installed a 3hp pump putting out about 30gpm.

After the well was installed and the irrigation system was on, the pump
would cycle on and off about every 4 or 5 minutes. This would go on for 4½ hours every morning. Common sense told me this was going to cause premature failure of the submersible pump.

So against my drillers advise, I installed the CSV125-3. Now the pump comes on at 40psi, pumps up to 50psi and stays there the entire time that the irrigation system is running. Once the irrigation system turns off, the pressure goes to 60psi and the pump shuts off.

*Everything works just like your website said it would. *

*I am a very happy camper.*


Thanks

Warren


6
Pictures and Cad drawings of pump systems / CSV Minimum Flow Chart
« on: June 08, 2017, 12:23:15 PM »
Minimum flow rate through Cycle Stop Valves at various differential pressures.

7
Fresh water supply for treatment plant

8
Pump Station Pictures / Buckaner Bay GC Rockport TX 1996
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:49:06 AM »
Rockport Texas

9
Pump Station Pictures / Jamaica Boynton Pump 2001
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:46:39 AM »
Jamaica Golf Course

10
Pump Station Pictures / Big Cedar Country Club 1997
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:43:50 AM »
Big Cedar Country Club

11
Pump Station Pictures / Bent Tree Golf Course 1999
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:41:22 AM »
Underwood Iowa

12
Pump Station Pictures / Bell Milam Falls Municipal system 2001
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:39:00 AM »
Cameron Texas

13
Pump Station Pictures / Baker Crossing Golf Course 2002
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:35:38 AM »
Baker Crossing GC

14
Pump Station Pictures / Austin Pump multistage pump with filter 2002
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:33:36 AM »
Austin Pump multistage pump with filter

15
Pump Station Pictures / Atlanta Falcons practice field 2002
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:31:07 AM »
Atlanta Falcons practice field 2002

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 15