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Messages - Cary Austin

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1
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« on: September 17, 2019, 03:34:13 PM »
They can also replace an existing line under a slab.  They drag something through that breaks up the old line as it pulls through a new one.

2
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« on: September 17, 2019, 02:14:06 PM »
Sounds like your new tank may have 50 PSI air charge instead of the 28 PSI it needs?  That is what causes a quick drop from 50 down.  Also sounds like you may have found the leak.  Sometimes it is easier to just run a new line.  It is not cheap, but you can even bore under things and not have to chip them up.  A short bore can be done with a home made jet on a piece of pipe attached to a garden hose.

3
Frequently Asked Questions / Re: problem with cycle sensor
« on: September 16, 2019, 05:01:18 PM »
The amps will vary with the flow rate according to the pump curve.  Unusual to go up with an increase in tank fill, but every pump is different.  Doesn't hurt anything and it sounds like everything is working good. 
Thanks
Cary

4
Frequently Asked Questions / Re: problem with cycle sensor
« on: September 16, 2019, 02:22:31 PM »
It maybe just a bad unit. If you are not getting 240V from L1 out and L2 out after supplying 240V to L1 in and L2 in, then the unit may not be working.  Check the voltage on L1 and L2 out and if not 240V request a warranty replacement.  You can see how it is suppose to work from the other unit.

How much the amps drop depends on several things.  If you have a way of pumping the well dry or pulling the pump up out of the water you can test it.  Otherwise just set it just below and as close to the running amps as possible like 95% of full load.  But generally a pump will drop about 50% in amps when pumping dry, as that is how much it takes to spin the motor even when there is no pump attached.

5
Valve Tech / Re: Pressure Tank Mounting Position
« on: September 09, 2019, 02:53:36 PM »
You should get many more years from that CSV1W.  But yes it can easily be replaced with the CSV1A if needed.  A hose bib in that line below the tank would be a good idea if you ever have the plumbing apart again.  Thanks

6
Valve Tech / Re: Pressure Tank Mounting Position
« on: September 09, 2019, 07:16:18 AM »
Thanks Man!
That looks really good.  I hope the tank being below the mainline doesn't cause the pipe going to the tank to clog with sand?  If the tank flushes quickly enough when using large amounts of water it should flush it out ok.  Just want to mention that you have a PK1W that we no longer offer.  This was replaced with the PK1A.  Even with all that sand the system is still working and we haven't sold a PK1W since 2013.  Means it has already lasted at least 6 years or more, even with the sand problem.
Thanks for the update!
Cary

7
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« on: September 05, 2019, 10:49:42 AM »
Yeah and 160' on poly pipe is a DIY job.  If you can get someone to pull and haul away the galve pipe, you could easily install the new pump yourself, plus be able to work on it yourself next time if needed.  After you get a quote on a turn key job you may want to consider this.   :)

8
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« on: September 05, 2019, 10:20:08 AM »
Sorry to the the bearer of bad news.  How deep is your pump and what type pipe is it hung on?

9
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« on: September 05, 2019, 09:43:00 AM »
No the CSV does not work as a check valve.  The only check you need is the one on the submersible pump.  If you have a jet pump a check valve is needed either on the suction line or before the CSV.

10
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« on: September 05, 2019, 06:51:15 AM »
Yeah any 4.4 to 10 gallon size tank will work.  But even with a bad tank the pump should not be cycling, especially when not using any water.  If the pump comes on when no water is being used you probably have a bad check valve.  And a bad check valve causing the pump to cycle while no one is using water could have destroyed the diaphragm in the tank.

11
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: CSV1A not keeping constant pressure
« on: September 03, 2019, 12:31:03 PM »
That is very common.  But the pressure relief must be moved to some place after the CSV.  Right now it maybe what is keeping the rubber bleeder down the well from popping out.  If you have a brass bleeder down the well, just move the pressure relief and we can make this work.  There are even three extra ports on the CSV1A, which any of can be used for the pressure relief valve.

If your pump guys didn't know to move the pressure relief valve then they had no idea how the CSV works, which is also very common.

12
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: CSV1A not keeping constant pressure
« on: September 03, 2019, 10:35:13 AM »
As long as you have a brass, not rubber bleeder orifice, the CSV1A works fine with a hydro tank.  The air charge will pass right through the CSV.  The only difference is the pump doesn't cycle as much, so it doesn't get as much air charge from the bleeder that is 5' down the well.  If you cannot maintain enough air, moving the bleeder to 10' below surface will put twice as much air in the tank with each cycle.  But it is usually cycling that causes the air to get lost from the pressure tank to start with, so with the CSV eliminating the cycling, not as much air needs to be added in the first place.  Most people do not need to lower their bleeder orifice. 

You also do not need to replace the pop off valve.  The fact that it is popping off tells me you have finally loosened the adjustment bolt on the CSV enough to make it start working.  You will always have higher pressure on the inlet side of the CSV, which is why the pressure relief valve needs to be after the CSV, not before.  But if you have a rubber bleeder, it will pop out when the CSV starts working and the pressure on the inlet pipes gets above 75 PSI.

There are a couple things more to consider when using a CSV on a hydro tank than on a bladder tank, but they work very well.  Your pump guys should have called me when they couldn't figure it out.  Usually they don't want it to work as pump cycling gives them a lot more business.   :)

13
Frequently Asked Questions / Re: setup
« on: September 03, 2019, 07:57:11 AM »
If you have a contactor or relay here is how to wire a Cycle Sensor.


14
Frequently Asked Questions / Re: setup
« on: September 03, 2019, 07:08:33 AM »
Yeah a Cycle Sensor would replace the BW and probes, and be a lot more dependable.

15
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: CSV1A not keeping constant pressure
« on: September 02, 2019, 03:50:42 PM »
If the pump cycles off while using any hose bibb after the CSV, then the CSV is set too high.  It is hard to tell where a CSV is set with a 120 gallon tank.  Using a 40/60 switch you would need the CSV set to hold about 57 PSI while running about 3 GPM from a hose bibb.  If the pressure creeps on up to 60 and the pump shuts off, the CSV is set too high.  You just have to watch it for a while to make sure the pressure doesn't slowly creep up from 57 to 60 and shut the pump off.

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