Recent Posts

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Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« Last post by Cary Austin on September 17, 2019, 03:34:13 PM »
They can also replace an existing line under a slab.  They drag something through that breaks up the old line as it pulls through a new one.
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Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« Last post by GloNDark on September 17, 2019, 02:19:25 PM »
Unfortunately it won't be easy or cheap in my case if it's under the concrete. We are on a slab foundation which further complicates things.

I will check the air charge tonight in the new expansion tank and see what it's at. Thanks for letting me vent! haha

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Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« Last post by Cary Austin on September 17, 2019, 02:14:06 PM »
Sounds like your new tank may have 50 PSI air charge instead of the 28 PSI it needs?  That is what causes a quick drop from 50 down.  Also sounds like you may have found the leak.  Sometimes it is easier to just run a new line.  It is not cheap, but you can even bore under things and not have to chip them up.  A short bore can be done with a home made jet on a piece of pipe attached to a garden hose.
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Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pressure tank replacement
« Last post by GloNDark on September 17, 2019, 01:11:39 PM »
The saga continues.
 
Pulled the well pump up and we had water at the top of the pipe and it held there for 30 minutes so the check valve most likely isn't my issue.

I installed a ball valve on the house side of the Fleck 5600 Water Softener and can confirm that if I shut off the water to the house it still leaks back.

Shut off the irrigation completely and confirm it still leaks back.

So looks like I have a pipe problem somewhere between the valve at the house and the well head. UGH Next step i'm going to dig up where the pipe is and then have a friend of mine come over and pressure test both sides. I don't know which is worse, having to dig up the new front yard or having to jackhammer the new walkway to the house if the leak is under the concrete. UGH

What's weird is, now with the new expansion tank.  Rises to 60 psi, then slowly drops to 50 psi (Slow as in 90 to 120 seconds to drop) and then once it hits 50 PSI it drops fast to the 30psi kick on and then repeats.
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Frequently Asked Questions / Re: problem with cycle sensor
« Last post by Cary Austin on September 16, 2019, 05:01:18 PM »
The amps will vary with the flow rate according to the pump curve.  Unusual to go up with an increase in tank fill, but every pump is different.  Doesn't hurt anything and it sounds like everything is working good. 
Thanks
Cary
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Frequently Asked Questions / Re: problem with cycle sensor
« Last post by steveh on September 16, 2019, 03:47:00 PM »
Thanks for the input. There is no voltage out of the cycle sensor so I will return for replacement from Amazon.

I did cycle the system to DRY and the amperage it showed just before shutting off was 3.88 amps. Good information to have. The reason I asked is that the amperage rises as my 1500 gallon storage tank fills up. The pump started out drawing 5.29 amps and as the tank water level rises so does the amperage draw of the pump. With 400 gallons in the tank it is up to 5.90 amps. I have the DRY setting at 5.03 amps now.

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Frequently Asked Questions / Re: problem with cycle sensor
« Last post by Cary Austin on September 16, 2019, 02:22:31 PM »
It maybe just a bad unit. If you are not getting 240V from L1 out and L2 out after supplying 240V to L1 in and L2 in, then the unit may not be working.  Check the voltage on L1 and L2 out and if not 240V request a warranty replacement.  You can see how it is suppose to work from the other unit.

How much the amps drop depends on several things.  If you have a way of pumping the well dry or pulling the pump up out of the water you can test it.  Otherwise just set it just below and as close to the running amps as possible like 95% of full load.  But generally a pump will drop about 50% in amps when pumping dry, as that is how much it takes to spin the motor even when there is no pump attached.
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Frequently Asked Questions / problem with cycle sensor
« Last post by steveh on September 16, 2019, 02:10:09 PM »
I have 2 wells and so I ordered 2 cycle sensors. I hooked up the first sensor to my well. It rapidly flashes 0.00 with no response from any of the control buttons. The troubleshooting guide says this means the pump is not running.
I remove the cycle sensor and the pump runs just fine. I put the second cycle sensor in the circuit and everything is fine. I set up the sensor and it is working as advertised.

What is the problem with the first cycle sensor? I don't want to try to install it in my second well until I know what is wrong.

I understand that when the well runs dry there is a drop in the pumps amperage draw and that sends the sensor into DRY and shuts down the power. What kind of drop in amperage actually happens when the well goes dry if you are seeing 5.80 amps when running normally?
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Valve Tech / Re: Pressure Tank Mounting Position
« Last post by Cary Austin on September 09, 2019, 02:53:36 PM »
You should get many more years from that CSV1W.  But yes it can easily be replaced with the CSV1A if needed.  A hose bib in that line below the tank would be a good idea if you ever have the plumbing apart again.  Thanks
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Valve Tech / Re: Pressure Tank Mounting Position
« Last post by Elton Noway on September 09, 2019, 01:55:33 PM »
Yep... I'll admit when completing this plumbing change it entered my mind sand might be able to settle in the line below the tank but decided to take a chance based on several changes I made. The first change was done several years ago... i.e., installing the Sandmaster. It reduced the sand considerably and I no longer have large amounts of sand accumulating in my toilet tanks as mentioned but its not 100% effective since I was still finding small amounts in my filter. 

As mentioned in an earlier post I installed a new well pump in June. Years ago I read somewhere (probably in a reply from you to a homeowner) that continual excessive dirt/sand in the water may be a result of the pump sitting on or near the bottom of the well.  The suggestion was to try raising the pump a few feet or so and see if the situation improves. Back then I didn't feel like going thru the hassle and hoped the sand separator would do the trick.

As long as I was replacing the pump I decided it would be the perfect time to raise the pump so I pulled it up about 8 feet. I also installed a new 40/60 pressure switch and raised it to 50/70. I then adjusted the pressure tank to 48psi thinking the additional pressure "might" help to move any sand that may accumulate. I'll be monitoring it off and on. Time will tell. Wishing now I had thought about installing a hose bib below the tank so I could flush the line periodically. Oh well... worse case I end up having to drop the entire manifold assembly a couple feet so I can get the pressure tank above the manifold... ugh. Just FYI: This system is mounted on a wall in a crawl space under the house with 5' 10"of clearance. Back in 2010 when I installed the original Pside-Kick kit... I intentionally mounted everything high on the wall just under the floor joist so I could stand up to do normal inspections and maintenance.

As to the CSV valve itself, the CSV1W its still working great, however in the event I eventually need to replace it, and with consideration to my existing installation, I'm thinking the CSV1A should  pretty much be a direct swap leaving the 1/2" and 3/4" ports plugged since they won't be needed with the current manifold setup. Correct? Better alternatives?
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