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Messages - Cary Austin

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1
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: 3 wire pump w/o ground?
« on: October 12, 2021, 10:12:49 AM »
Can't tell by looking.  But with an ohm meter a three wire motor should show no short to ground on any of the three wires.  With a two wire motor one of the wires is a ground and will show 100% short to ground.

2
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Off grid well
« on: October 07, 2021, 07:05:42 AM »
Just the depth of 360' will cause 155 PSI pressure on the pipe.  Add to that the 60 PSI needed up top and you are at 215 PSI.  You can still get 10 GPM at 50 PSI from 360' using a 10GS15, and the CSV will cause the pipe to see 242 PSI.  So, yes the 250# pipe is recommended.

3
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Off grid well
« on: October 06, 2021, 11:46:33 AM »
It really depends on your water needs?  For just a house you only need 5 GPM max and a total of 300 gallons per day.  Your well stores about 1.5 gallons per foot.  So, you really only need to set the pump at like 230' to have 300 gallons stored.  Set at 380' you would have 525 gallons stored in the well, and I doubt you will ever pull the water level down lower than 230' or so.  At that depth, even a 1HP, can give you 10 GPM at 50 PSI.

If you want to irrigate or something everything changes.  But we would still need to know how much water you need as it takes a much smaller pump set at a more shallow depth to give 5 GPM to sprinklers than if you want to run 15 GPM sprinklers.

The smaller the pump the lower the power requirements for solar or a generator.  For just house use I think you would be happy with a 7 GPM, 3/4HP set at 230' deep.

4
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Off grid well
« on: October 04, 2021, 08:22:55 AM »
Sorry for the delay.  Don't get much done when I am keeping the granddaughter over the weekend.  Lol.  First off a 3HP, 10GS30 is designed to work in wells from 600-800 feet deep.  All you need to get 10 GPM at 50 PSI from 380' is a 1.5, 10GS15.  Using a normal 240V single phase motor if you attack it to 480' of "10 wire, the long length of small wire works like a soft starter.  Using the longest length of the smallest wire possible for the HP pump being used causes a reduction in torque of 36%.  No need for any VFD or soft starter.

With a 30' static level the 1.5HP pump will build 225 PSI back pressure on the pipe prior to the CSV.  This is a little more back pressure than we like on the CSV1A but will work fine as long as your pipe is rated for 225 PSI or more.  All you need to control this pump is a PK1A control kit with a 10 gallon size tank.  The higher the pressure you want the better for the differential pressure.  So if you would like 60 or even 70 PSI constant, just get the PK1A kit with the heavy duty pressure switch that can be turned up to 60/80 as needed.  This size pump with the small wire will start easily on a generator of a 230V inverter.  The three wire version with a capacitor start box will start even easier, and is recommended.

Putting a CSV or a pressure reducing valve after the pressure tank will give you a constant pressure.  However, it will be low constant pressure and the pump will still be cycling itself to death while you are getting low constant pressure.

Call us ig you want to discuss.  Thanks.  Cary

5
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Storage Tanks and Submersible Pump
« on: September 30, 2021, 01:25:54 PM »
That will work.  Let me know if I can help.  Thanks

6
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Storage Tanks and Submersible Pump
« on: September 30, 2021, 11:20:14 AM »
That 2HP would be fine if you were pumping from a well that is 150' deep.  But it is too much pressure for a cistern pump.  The 60/80 and constant 70 should be more than you need and will still give 40 PSI on the upper floor.  The 1HP is a cheap pump if you decide it is not doing the job you can replace it and turn up the pressure on the CSV1A and heavy duty pressure switch.  But I think you would still want a 1HP, but a 15-16 GPM version that can build more pressure than that 33 GPM pump end.

7
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Storage Tanks and Submersible Pump
« on: September 30, 2021, 10:25:16 AM »
To get 50 PSI at the top of the 45' lift you will need the CSV set to deliver 70 PSI.  You will need the 10 gallon tank and a heavy duty pressure switch set for 60/80.  That pump can build 90, so it will work with the pressure switch set up to 60/80, but no higher.

8
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Storage Tanks and Submersible Pump
« on: September 30, 2021, 07:14:16 AM »
With 45' elevation you will lose 20 PSI before water gets to the house.  Starting with a 50/70 pressure switch and a CSV set at 60 PSI, you will still have a constant 40 PSI at the house.  That pump builds a max head of 207' or 90 PSI, which will work fine with the 50/70 switch setting.

9
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pump suggestions for low yield well.
« on: September 29, 2021, 11:53:43 AM »
40' of water in the well is storing 60 gallons for you to use a fast as needed.  So yes the 10 GPM pump is best, even if you use a 2 GPM Dole valve.  To utilize the 60 gallons stored in the well you will need to draw the level all the way down and let it fill back up over time.  The most efficient way is to let the pump produce 10 GPM for 6 minutes, then the Cycle Sensor will shut it off and you can set the restart timer for about 30 minutes.  However, if this causes rust or any other problems with the water, using a 2 GPM Dole valve and letting the pump run as long as needed to fill the cistern is your only other option.  but you will still need the Cycle Sensor in case it pumps the well dry over a long time.  60 gallons stored in the well is probably enough to run a house directly off the 10 GPM pump in the well and not need a cistern.  Or you can hook it up where you can get water directly from the well pump or the booster pump in the cistern if you like.  Always nice having a backup water supply.


10
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pump suggestions for low yield well.
« on: September 28, 2021, 09:50:20 AM »
1/2HP is the largest (only size) you can get in 115V.  The 10 GPM series would be best.  CSIR is easier to start, but won't make much difference.  Use the same 4" white PVC drain pipe to make the stand as the shroud.  Open ended they don't need ballast. 

11
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pump suggestions for low yield well.
« on: September 28, 2021, 07:57:19 AM »
Yeah you can lay a submersible on its side.  Keep it off the bottom and use a flow inducer or shroud to keep the motor cool.

12
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pump suggestions for low yield well.
« on: September 27, 2021, 01:59:02 PM »
Nearly all submersible and jet pumps are centrifugal.  It would be rare as hen's teeth to have a positive displacement pump.  Some of the newer solar pumps are positive displacement, but that is all.  Yes your pump will work easier when the CSV reduces the flow rate.

For 25 GPM at 50-60 PSI you would want something like a Grundfos 25S10-7 in submersible or a J15S Goulds jet pump.

For the well pump at 50-60' filling a cistern, 1/2HP is about as small as you can get.  Use a 10S05-9 Grundfos and add a 5 GPM Dole valve.

13
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: Pump sugestions for low yield well.
« on: September 27, 2021, 11:19:49 AM »
What is more important than a good pump is a Cycle Sensor to shut the pump off before it is damaged from running dry.  That being said I still like the pumps with Stainless Steel impellers like in a Grundfos instead of plastic, especially on a low yield well.

15
Pumps, Wells, Tanks, Controls / Re: New Pump for off grid or battery backup.
« on: September 22, 2021, 10:58:02 AM »
Sure a VFD will reduce the starting current from 6X to about 3X.  But you don't have to use A VFD to get a soft start.  Simply using the longest length of the smallest wire possible for the horsepower pump you have will create 36% less starting torque all by itself.  This reduces the current available to the motor for start up, which still works fine.  There are also pumps like the Grundfos SQ that have a soft starter built into the motor.  Studies show that you will spend 3 times as much maintaining a VFD pump system as a traditional pump system, so VFD should be the last resort.

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