Author Topic: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?  (Read 607 times)

racerboy

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Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« on: February 10, 2022, 01:19:51 PM »
First, my apologies if I am posting this in the wrong place, but I just have not been very successful in getting good advice from my local well-pump guy.  I live in northern NJ and have a low-yield well.  The well is 500' deep and I have a 3/4 hp well pump.  I have lived in this house and have had to replace my well pump two times.  I have also had the well hydrofracked 3 years ago.  I have been looking for ways to improve the water use, which is why I am here.  I am not sure that the CSV system helps someone like me but figured it couldn’t hurt to ask.  I am always nervous about my well running dry (again).
 
My house was built with an irrigation system, but the fellow who built it (my neighbor) never actually got it up and running, and I am fearful of even thinking about that.  Last summer, I just ran a simple lawn sprinkler for about an hour, and it wiped out my well.  It's very frustrating.  My well pump guy keeps telling me to drill a new well.  Drilling another 500' well is going to cost $20k, and no guarantee.  Ouch.  I have several neighbors who have zero issues with their wells, and some of their wells are only 100' deep.  My nearest neighbor did dig a second well for his water sprinkler system, and he runs it every night in the summer.  I think there is plenty of water around me, even if my well is not the highest-yielder.

I did a little research into something called a Well Manager, that puts a 210 gal storage tank in my basement and always makes sure it is full.  Then then I stumbled onto the Terry Love Plumbing site and I saw a lot of people talking about how one of these CSV systems helped them with inefficient well systems.  So, I was wondering if this CSV is something I should consider.  I think I have a 40-gallon "blue tank" now.  Happy to post a photo if that helps.
Sorry for the long first post.

Also, when I turn on the water, I get spurts of air coming out of the faucet.  How does air get in the system? 

Thanks,
Frank

Cary Austin

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Re: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2022, 08:47:26 AM »
Hi Frank
The Cycle Stop Valve has a few benefits for a low yielding well, but the Cycle Sensor is what you need to protect the pump.  The Cycle Sensor will shut the pump off when the well runs dry to protect the pump.  Then you can set the timer in the Cycle Sensor to restart the pump after say 20 minutes to let the well recover a bit.  There are lots of devices similar to the Cycle Sensor and your pump man should have already installed one in a situation like this.  If you already have a Pumtec or Symcom they are not working if you burned up a pump.

The Well Manager is a very good product and they use Cycle Stop Valves on their re-pressurization pump.  You can make something similar with a regular cistern tank if you like.  Here are a couple of drawings.  You will still only have as much water available as the well can produce, but the cistern or well manager lets you store water at a low flow rate so you can use it at any flow rate you needed.

racerboy

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Re: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2022, 01:04:30 PM »
Thank you Cary.  I do not believe my pump guy installed anything to prevent the pump from burning up (hence why I went through 2 of them n a relatively short time).  Is this Cycle Sensor a relatively easy install?  Does it get connected to the pressure switch, or does the pump have to come out of the well?  The reason I ask is that I have no way of pulling hte pump out of the well, but if the sensor gets mounted to the wiring that goes down to the pump, then I think I need to order one.

Thank you for the postings.  I am going to take a look at them and see if I can come up with a DIY idea that is less than the cost of the Well Manager.  I am sure it is a good system, but it costs about $7000. Thanks again,
Frank

Cary Austin

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Re: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2022, 02:42:48 PM »
The Cycle Sensor is very easy to install.  It can go anywhere between the breaker and the pressure switch.  Basically just cut the wire that goes between the breaker and pressure switch to install the Cycle Sensor.  It will also need to be adjusted to the parameters of your pump, which is also easy.  Here are a couple of videos that might help and you can call us if you need more.

https://vimeo.com/248374357

https://vimeo.com/248374371

racerboy

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Re: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2022, 03:54:14 PM »
Thank you!  That does appear to be relatively easy to install.  I have a 1 hp pump (according to what the pump guy wrote on my pressure tank).  Should I also replace my pressure tank?  I'm not sure of the size, but it sits about 48" tall. I also have a water softening system.  Not sure if that matters.  Lastly, I believe I have a 40/60 pressure switch, but after I had a lot of issues last summer, I turned it down to more like 30/50.  It seemed like that when the pump would come on, it could never get to 60 psi .  I have a little light next to the pump switch that goes on whenever the pump is running.  I was worried that the pump would burn up tying to reach that 60 psi mark.  I haven't had any issues since I reduced the psi (knock on wood) but I would still like to take some preventive measures from running out of water again. 

Cary Austin

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Re: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2022, 04:46:08 PM »
You maybe right about it not being able to reach 60 PSI.  A 1HP, 7GPM pump can only reach 60 PSI if the water level is less than 360'.  You well pump is set at 480', but it can't really pump from that deep and still reach 60 PSI. 

Try pumping the well with a hose and let the pressure get down to 10 PSI or so.  If it continues to pump water your well is not weak it is just deeper than the pump can draw from.  Might need a larger pump.

racerboy

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Re: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2022, 08:59:29 PM »
Thanks Cary.  It’s pretty cold here (8 degrees this morning) but once it warms up a bit I’m going to give that a try. I’m going to order the Cycle Sensor from your website tomorrow.

Do you think there is any value to adding a storage tank(s) in my basement between the pump and the pressure tank?  Doesn’t that sort of give me the same solution as a Well Manager?  Again, I’m sure that’s a great system but it’s a pretty steep purchase for me.

Cary Austin

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Re: Does a CSV system help a low-yield well?
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2022, 06:43:14 AM »
If you cannot deepen the pump to access more water from the well, a cistern and booster pump maybe the next option.  Like in the drawings I posted above, you can make a cistern storage system that will make the most out of the water you are getting.  But you are always better off if you can get water directly from the well.