Author Topic: Leakage  (Read 8671 times)

pitbull

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Leakage
« on: June 25, 2011, 11:33:17 AM »
Will the 'Z' series prevent external leakage?  I need to change the location which will require no leakage (dry area).
The CSV1 I currently use in the casing leaks.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 12:32:51 PM by pitbull »

Cary Austin

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Re: Leakage
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2011, 05:23:40 PM »
Yes the  CSV1Z is the one you want if it is installed indoors.  Forum trouble.  Call if you have questions.  800-652-0207

countrymanners

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Re: Leakage
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2012, 08:54:41 PM »
I have a few questions for Cary.    I am wanting to install a CSV1A in a room on the main floor of our house in the utility room which does not have a drain.   Does this model leak?  Is there any risk in installing this unit on the main floor?   Where can I purchase a pressure relief value for this unit?   Does this valve have to be plumbed into the drain system?   :-\   

Cary Austin

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Re: Leakage
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2012, 07:34:25 AM »
NO the 1A does not leak.  It can be installed anywhere and in any configuration.  Yes you can use a pressure relief valve and a 1/2" one will fit on the side of the CSV1A itself.

DUNNING

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Re: Leakage
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2013, 10:35:23 AM »
I have had a CSV 150 on my house/heat pump system for 3 years and it just started leaking a rapid drip at the flange. I snugged the screws but they were already tight-the valve continued to leak so I bought a new CSV 150. When I installed the new one it immediately had a slow leak in the same place so I again tried snugging the screws and that might have slowed it a little but it still leaks. The valve is installed horizontal and has black plastic pipe on a 90deg on the inlet and outlet and the alignment is good so there is no excessive force stressing the flange. Pump shut off is about 55PSI and I have a large expansion tank.
I disassembled the original valve  and I did not find anything wrong-the rubber (seal at the flange) looks in good shape and is resilient.
This unit is in the basement and I don't want to have empty a bucket every few days-leaks about 2 cups per day. Are these valves prone to leakage? Any brain storms??

Cary Austin

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Re: Leakage
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2013, 08:19:15 AM »
Here is the link to info on that valve.
http://www.cyclestopvalves.com/prod_csv1_geninfo.html


“The CSV1/1.25 is recommended for potable water systems and does not tolerate bacteria, algae, or sand abrasion. It is very important that this model not be put in a bind as it will bend in the middle and begin to squirt water until it is straightened back up.

Over time, (how long depends on water quality) the CSV1/1.25 can begin to vent water to atmosphere. (The valve will not weep when the pump is not running as the weep is a function of the valve actuating and not a leak) The CSV1/1.25 valve will function correctly whether it is venting air or water. If this "weeping" is not acceptable for your application, * the CSV1/1.25 should be installed in the well casing using the CSC1/CSC1.25 coupling) An alternative model for most of the same applications would be the CSV1W or CSV1A. These models better tolerate bacteria, algae, and abrasives and do not vent water to atmosphere.”


It is possible that you got a new valve with a bad diaphragm, but very unlikely.  Plumbing the valve in a bind, something slimy or abrasive in the water, or a pump that can build more than 150 PSI are the only things that should make that valve leak.  But we do recommend that valve be installed in the well, outside, or somewhere where a small leak won’t cause a problem.

The CSV1A is made for inside installation and will not leak the way the plastic valves will.

Cary Austin

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Re: Leakage
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2013, 03:00:56 PM »
I meant to say also that it doesn't matter why it leaks, we will still replace it if less than 12 months old.  But we will only replace it once.  So if you know you are going to have a problem with water quality or high pressure, you can instead ask for a credit towards the purchase of a CSV1A valve.  There is always a trade off however.  Because you can replace the plastic valve about three times for the price of a CSV1A.  Kind of depends on how long the plastic valves last in your application. 

I have a plastic valve that has been working for 16 years.  Of course it is installed inside the well casing so a small leak is never noticed.